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Understanding Probation in Texas: Types and Requirements

By Sholdon Daniels

A girl sits across from her probation officer in an office.
Make sure you contact your probation officer if you have questions about your case.

Probation is a form of criminal punishment that allows offenders to serve their sentence outside of prison or jail, under certain conditions. In Texas, probation is known as community supervision, and it is available in several forms, each with its own unique requirements and restrictions.


Regular Community Supervision:


Regular community supervision is the most common form of probation in Texas. It is granted by a judge, and the conditions of probation are based on the severity of the offense and the individual needs of the offender. Regular community supervision typically lasts between one and ten years and may include conditions such as:

  • Meeting with a probation officer regularly

  • Avoiding illegal drugs and alcohol

  • Completing community service hours

  • Paying restitution to victims

  • Completing a treatment program for drug or alcohol addiction

  • Staying away from certain people or places

  • Submitting to drug tests

  • Not committing any new offenses

Deferred Adjudication:


Deferred adjudication is another form of probation in Texas. It is only available for certain offenses, and if the offender successfully completes the probation period, they will not have a conviction on their record. Deferred adjudication is typically available for non-violent offenses and first-time offenders. The conditions of deferred adjudication usually include things such as:

  • Meeting with a probation officer regularly

  • Completing community service hours

  • Paying restitution to victims

  • Completing a treatment program for drug or alcohol addiction

  • Staying away from certain people or places

  • Submitting to drug tests

  • Not committing any new offenses

Shock Probation:


Shock probation is a combination of prison and probation. It is only available for offenders who have already spent time in prison, typically for a short period of time. After the offender has served a portion of their prison sentence, the judge may release them on shock probation, which allows them to serve the remainder of their sentence on probation. The conditions of shock probation are typically the same as regular community supervision.


Intensive Supervision Probation:


Intensive supervision probation is a more rigorous form of probation that is reserved for high-risk offenders. The conditions of intensive supervision probation may include:

  • Meeting with a probation officer more frequently

  • Wearing an electronic monitoring device

  • Submitting to drug and alcohol tests more frequently

  • Participating in a treatment program for drug or alcohol addiction

  • Completing a certain number of community service hours each month

  • Paying restitution to victims

  • Not committing any new offenses

Overall, probation in Texas is a form of criminal punishment that allows offenders to serve their sentence outside of prison or jail. It is available in several forms, each with its own unique requirements and restrictions, and the type of probation that an offender receives is typically based on the severity of the offense and the individual needs of the offender. If you're facing criminal charges in Texas, speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney like me to learn more about your options and to determine the best course of action for your case.


Call 1-844-SHOLDON to schedule a consultation as my phones are answered 24/7.

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